The last frontier of vintage arrives on TikTok. Here are the shops to discover and fall in love with



Not just Y2K trends. The beloved and much-followed second-hand stores on ByteDance’s social network boast enviable archives and unobtainable pieces. To be found directly among the TikTok videos of these shops.

Interest in second-hand fashion seems to know no bounds. After the great success of apps like Vinted and Vestiaire Collective, it is now TikTok that is the platform where vintage shops of all kinds and at every latitude proliferate. With more than 185 million views for the hashtag “vintage shop”, ByteDance’s social network is the latest frontier for fans of second-hand or archive clothing, who can discover new addresses, forgotten collections and emerging realities that have made it their mission to search for clothes from the past. To buy with more and more awareness, creating an original and unique wardrobe, rediscovering the love of fashion.

Lovers Lane Vintage, a hidden gem in London

At first glance it might look like one of the many second-hand stores that fill the pavements of Portobello Road. Lovers Lane Vintage, on the other hand, is a little place to discover and get lost in. The selection is wide and carefully curated, with a particular passion for the work of designers such as Roberto Cavalli, Fendi, Chanel, Gucci by Tom Ford, with garments made in the late 1990s and early 2000s. In the London shop (which also sells through its social channels) you can find many logoed garments, denim creations and, above all, It Bag collectibles. Like the one chosen by influencer and journalist, as well as great vintage enthusiast, Camille Charriere, who bought a Christian Dior trunk with monogram and heart-shaped pendant here.

The Big Apple’s vintage shops

They were the first to shape a shared and recognised language on TikTok, finding in Gen Z and younger users a very receptive audience for this kind of content (and aesthetics). Passionate about second hand clothes since she was a child, Emma Rogue opened her eponymous store just over a year ago on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. With almost 190,000 followers, Rogue is recognised both for its curated selection of 90s and 2000s clothing and for its collaborations with emerging companies, establishing itself as a point of reference for New York’s youth. Emma herself has become the face of the store, thanks to the format in which she interviews her customers, conversing about current trends and obsessions.

Two other New York businesses that are popular on TikTok are the fruit of female entrepreneurship. Brooklyn-based Tired Thrift was opened by two cousins in their early twenties and is known for its corsets, fun print T-shirts, and colourful dresses. Online they show the behind-the-scenes of running a shop, the daily grind of searching for and arranging clothes, the sales and the vintage treasures they hold. Funny Pretty Nice, on the other hand, founded by 26-year-old Natalia Spotts, has become the epitome of a feminine and colourful aesthetic, managing to build a solid community online and offline.

For It Shoes worthy of Carrie Bradshaw

Nou is much more than just a jewellery brand. Indeed, the brand’s founder, Lexi, has turned her TikTok profile into a little piece of paradise for all lovers of vintage heels by Dior, Fendi or Gucci. The result of a thorough and constant search among second-hand markets and online, sling backs, knee-high boots and pumps are then put up for sale on Nou’s site, available in small quantities that regularly sell out. Collector’s items that cannot be missing from the wardrobe of a contemporary Carrie.

TikTok thus contributes to the success of vintage shops, a favourite destination for the younger generation.